Ground

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In electrical terms, ground is the safe point of discharge of unwanted static electricity. Ground represents “zero electrical potential.” When something is grounded, it’s neutral; it has no charge. Attaching a conductive floor to ground ensures that the static charges will be diverted to the earth through the conductive floor system. Typical grounds include: electrical conduit, building steel, copper bus bars and steel rods buried in the earth.

The portion of the wrist strap, which provides flexibility of movement while completing the electrical circuit between the cuff at one end and a ground system at the other.

(1) A conductor intended to provide an electrical path to ground. (2) An item used by personnel with a specified resistance, intended to provide a path to ground. Groundable point - a designated connection location or assembly used on an electrostatic discharge protective material or device that is intended to accommodate electrical connection from the device to an appropriate electrical ground.


A point on the floor material that is intended to accommodate an electrical connection from the floor material to an appropriate electrical ground.

Any floor with electrically conductive properties that is attached to either electrical or earth ground. Grounding of conductive or dissipative floors is usually achieved by physically attaching the ESD flooring solution (conductive or dissipative epoxy coating, conductive or dissipative carpeting or carpet tiles, conductive or dissipative vinyl tiles or sheet goods, conductive or dissipative rubber tiles or sheet goods) to a certified ground connection using copper strips or grounding wires. The most common methods of grounding involve the combination of conductive adhesive for securing the floor and copper strips attaching the adhesive with the electrical ground connection in a building.

The total resistance from any given point in an electrically conductive path to the grounding electrode.


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