SICK Building Syndrome

Showing 15 of 15 articles in total.

"sick building syndrome" (SBS): Describes situations in which building occupants experience acute health and comfort effects that appear to be linked to time spent in a building, but no specific illness or cause can be identified. The complaints may be localized in a particular room or zone, or may be widespread throughout the building. In contrast, to the term "building related illness" (BRI).


A permanently installed floor material such as tile, carpet, polymer, epoxy, or sheet flooring that controls static charges on personnel, equipment, or other objects contacting the floor material.


A non-permanent coating periodically applied to existing floor surfaces that dissipates static charges by grounding personnel, equipment, or other objects contacting the floor finish or that controls the generation and accumulation of static charges associated with floor materials.


A movable island of material placed over existing flooring that dissipates static charges by grounding personnel, equipment, or other objects contacting the floor material or that controls the generation and accumulation of static charges associated with the material.


A permanently installed floor material such as tile, carpet, polymer, epoxy or sheet flooring that dissipates static charges by grounding personnel, equipment, or other objects contacting the floor material or that controls the generation and accumulation of static charges associated with floor materials.


A generic term used to describe any form of flooring that is designed to reduce static electricity on people. Static control flooring is available in numerous forms including: carpeting, carpet tiles, vinyl tile, rubber tile and epoxy coatings. A more specific description should be used when specifying this type of flooring. A meaningful flooring specification should always include electrical resistance in Ohms and triboelectric performance measured in volts.


Covering for the human foot that have properties to control the accumulation of static charge when used in conjunction with a static control floor or floor finish, or floor mat.


Chairs used in conjunction with a static control floor or static control floor mat that are intended to control the generation, accumulation and dissipation of electrostatic charge associated with the seating.


A procedure in which an item is first charged to a specified voltage, then allowed to dissipate to a specified voltage while measuring the duration of the discharge.


Static dissipative floors are defined by a property called electrical resistance. Electrical resistance is measured in ohms. The important parameter for describing a floor is the static control flooring resistance to ground or path to ground. In order to meet the qualification of static dissipative, a floor must have an electrical resistance to ground of ≥ 1 X 106 (one million ohms) AND < 1 X 109. Static dissipative should never be confused with the terms Conductive or Antistatic (sometimes hyphenated as anti-static). Note: The old definition of static dissipative was; A material that can conduct an electrical charge and has an inherent resistivity range between 1 x 104 ohms and 1 x 1011 ohms Sometimes referred to as electrically dissipative. This old definition does not apply to flooring.


Literally “electricity at rest.” Static electricity is the stored energy that becomes dangerous when it becomes an ESD event. Static electricity is the result of the exchange of electrons that occurs during friction between objects. This friction causes the ESD event, which can disrupt production, cause fires, damage computers and sensitive electronic components, cause computers and other electronic equipment to malfunction and lose important data.


A durable, stain resistant floor-covering with ergonomic features and antistatic (anti-static) properties. Any resilient flooring material such as rubber, polypropylene or vinyl that will not generate excessive quantities of static electricity. Describing a flooring material as static resistant (or anti static), does not mean that the material can also ground or discharge or dissipate static electricity. A static resistant material could inhibit static generation on people but lack the conductive properties necessary for grounding of static charges. The ideal static control material should be both conductive and antistatic. A term found in Division 9 - Finishes 09650.6 Static-resistant resilient flooring.


This is a unique conductive monofilament spun within the yarn bundle. It is used to achieve conductive contact points on the surface of the carpet. [Also Staticworx® Helix Fibre]


The ratio of DC voltage to the current flowing between two electrodes of specified configuration that contact the same side of a material. This measurement is expressed in ohms.


For electric current flowing across a surface, the ratio of DC voltage drop per unit length to the surface current per unit width. In effect, the surface resistivity is the resistance between two opposite sides of a square and is independent of the size of the square or its dimensional units. Surface resistivity is expressed in ohms/square.



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